Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications
Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications
2005 Research Results

CMOS / Microfluidic Chip for Tissue Assembly
Kit Parker, Donhee Ham, and R.M. Westervelt

CMOS / Microfluidic Chip for Tissue Assembly

A difficulty in the use of engineered tissues in the treatment of traumatic injury is the inability to make the time needed for surgical reconstruction of the injured tissue (hours) comparable to that needed for in vitro assembly of engineered replacement tissues (weeks).

Our new technology to address this problem consists of a custom-designed microfluidic chamber built on top of a CMOS chip (Fig. 1). The CMOS chip contains an array of microcoils that creates spatially patterned magnetic fields in inside the microfluidic system above. These magnetic fields interact with ligand-coated magnetic beads that are bound to the membrane receptors on cells salvaged, and sorted, from the damaged tissues. Using the chip, these cells can be rapidly moved by synchronized current flow in the CMOS microcoil array (Figure 2). This synchrony allows the cells to be assembed on, extracellular matrix targets created by microcontact printing.

 

  Last Modified June 20, 2006 by the NSEC Office.