Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications
Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications
2007 NSEC Events

2007

January 3-7, 2007
Dynamics Days: DDays is an annual conference on topics in nonlinear dynamics. Sessions will cover a very broad range of topics including bio-networks, internal and chemical waves, pattern formation, insect flight, statistical physics, computational neuroscience, synchronization and control of nonlinear systems, cardiac dynamics and much more.
Hilton Back Bay, Boston MA
http://www.bu.edu/provost/ddays_07/

January 16-17, 2007
5th Annual Users workshop, sponsored by DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) The Workshop agenda will include plenary talks by leading scientists, exciting research results from current CINT Users, focused break-out sessions on nanoscience, integration challenges, and Discovery Platforms. The CINT Expo will provide a step-by-step guide to becoming a CINT User and ample time for prospective Users to discuss the research capabilities with the CINT scientists. An optional tour (advance registration required) of CINT will be available immediately following the User Workshop.
Albuquerque, NM
http://cint.sandia.gov

February 20, 2007
Deadline for PRISE 2007 applications
PRISE is a 10-week summer residential community of undergraduates participating in research affiliated with Harvard Faculty, drawn from the entire Harvard undergraduate population. The Program seeks to create a diverse group of Fellows including but not limited to women and underrepresented minorities who are inspired by and are committed to pursuing excellence in scientific research.

The Program will run from June 18-August 24, 2007, and offers PRISE Fellows free lodging and a partial board plan. While there is no stipend or research funding associated with the Program, participants who are financial aid recipients will be eligible to receive awards that compensate for their summer saving obligation.

PRISE participation is open to any continuing undergraduate student who is in good standing and affiliated with a Harvard Faculty sponsored laboratory, regardless of whether or not they are funded for their summer research by the lab or a research-sponsoring program (such as HCRP, Herchel Smith, Stem Cell Institute, etc.). Students who are in laboratories for the summer to gain research experience with Harvard Faculty but are not being paid are eligible to apply. Laboratory sponsors do NOT have to be confirmed at the time of the application deadline.

Questions about PRISE may be directed to prise@fas.harvard.edu .
Gregory A. Llacer

February 20-21, 2007
Frontiers in Computational Nanoelectronics Workshop, Univeristy Place Conferencce Center and Hotel IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN
For more information: http://www.ncn.purdue.edu/workshops/frontiers_in_computational_nanoelectronics/

February 20-23, 2007
NNCI2007: International Symposium Nanoelectronics, Nanostructures and Carrier Interaction
The conference covers all aspects of fabrication and characterization of semiconductor nanosystems, nanotubes, and other materials. Carrier interactions and coherent controls in semiconductor and other nanosystems are also intensively discussed in the conference.
NTT Artsugi R&D Center, Kanagawa, Japan
For more information: http://www.brl.ntt.co.jp/event/nnci2007/

February 22, 2007
Nanotechnology and Business Forum
4:00-6:00 p.m. Greenberg & Traurig, One International Place, Boston, MA
For a discussion on the Outlook of Nanotechnology for 2007
Speakers: David Arslanian, COO, Inavative, Inc.
Warren Green, President, True North Advisors Group, LLC
RSVP: veneziaj@gtlaw.com
The forum will also be web cast. Please contact Jessica Venezia if you can not attend the forum in person but would like to view the web cast.

February 27, 2007
The NRI e-Workshop series
4:00 pm, Harvard University, Pierce Hall room 209
The series is aimed at educating both our industry sponsors and other university participants (both students and PIs) on specific research topics being done at NRI centers. You are invited to participate the Quantum Transport Studies of Strongly Correlated Electrons for Next Generation Logic Devices e-Workshop, to be presented by Matthew Gilbert, UT Austin & John Shumway, Arizona State on February 27, 2007, 4:00-5:30p eastern / 3:00-4:30p central / 2:00-3:30p mountain / 1:00-2:30p pacific. This e-Workshop is presented via Microsoft Live Meeting and a phone bridge.
We have a limited number of simultaneous connections available; therefore, we ask each company to select a site coordinator and reserve a conference room with a projector to accommodate multiple participants. To participate, all you need is a PC with internet connection and a phone line. Multiple sites may participate from each company.
To participate in this e-Workshop, please register on-line at http://www.src.org/nri/eworkshops.asp
Site coordinators will be e-mailed with the detailed log-in information approximately one week prior to e-Workshop. Immediately following the workshop, site coordinators will be asked to provide a rating, feedback/comments on the workshop, and the number of participants from that site via an on-line survey. This survey should take approx. five minutes and greatly assists us in making our e-Workshops better.
ABSTRACT
As semiconductor devices are scaled further down to increasingly smaller sizes, the number of electrons participating in the transport continues to shrink as well. The combination of reduced dimensionality and number of electrons forces the electrons to participate in a well choreographed dance as they respond to applied fields. Devices which operate in the regime of strongly correlated electron states are predicted to exhibit exotic and dramatic changes in the resultant output characteristics. Currently, one of the most popular vehicles for observing and exploiting these effects are semiconductor quantum wires. This is due to both academic and industrial interest in the growth, characterization, and implementation of quantum wires as a possible means of extending the lifetime of CMOS. Furthermore, with appropriate gating, we may vary the electron density inside the quantum wire over several orders of magnitude easily reaching the regime where strong correlations occur. As a corollary, there is also a great need to find reliable modeling tools to characterize and benchmark the physics inherent in these new devices prior to fabrication. In this talk, we will discuss the use of path integral Monte Carlo to determine the transport properties of low density gated semiconductor quantum wires. This path integral method is well suited for high-accuracy treatment of electron correlation, finite temperature effects, and non-fermi liquid behavior, such as spin-charge separation. In addition, the path integral method can also be used to calculate experimentally relevant quantities such as conductance. The goal of these calculations is to investigate structures that would use spin-charge separation as an electrical means of generating spin waves and currents for low-dissipation logic devices.
If you have any questions, please let me know. We look forward to your participation.
Lisa Bevins
Nanoelectronics Research Initiative
phone: (919) 941-9433
fax: (919) 941-9450
iwww.src.org/nri

March 8, 2007
Dr. Bailyn, MIT: Beyond Bias and Barriers
Maxwell Dworkin Room 119, at 33 Oxford Street from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., with a reception to follow. Dr. Bailyn, a Professor of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the author of Breaking the Mold: Redesigning Work for Productive and Satisfying Lives and Beyond Work-Family Balance: Advancing Gender Equity and Workplace Performance.

March 12-16, 2007
Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics Symposium and Spring School, Phoenix, AX
http://www.atomicscaledesign.net/ngc2007/

March 29-31, 2007
FNST: Frontiers in Nanoscale Sceince and Technology workshop
University of Tokyo, Convention Hall, Komaba Research Campus
FNST website: http://www.nsec.harvard.edu/fnst/index.htm

March 29, 2007
Open House and Cocktail Reception, Greenberg Traurig, LLC
to welcome our newest ShareholderFormer Massachusetts Attorney General Tom Reilly
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m, Greenberg Traurig, One International Place, Boston, MA 02110
Please RSVP by March 22 to 617.310.6080 or GTBostonEvents@gtlaw.com

April 9-13, 2007
Quantum Information and Comutation V (DS25)
Orlando, Florida
http://spie.org/Conferences/Calls/07/dss/conferences/index.cfm?fuseaction=DS25

April 9-13, 2007
2007 MRS Spring Meeting
Moscone West, San Francisco, California
http://www.mrs.org/s_mrs/sec.asp?CID=7605&DID=186909

April 11, 2007
UC Santa Barbara's Center for Nanotechnology in Society (CNS) and the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) will launch a collaborative forum called NanoCafé on Wednesday, April 11, 2007 from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. at UC Santa Barbara.
Each NanoCafé will cover a different nanotechnology-related issue. This first NanoCafé will be an introduction to nanotechnologies, how they affect our lives, their benefits, and potential risks involved. Speaking at the first event will be CNSI Director Evelyn Hu and CNS Co-Director Patrick McCray.
http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=21681

April 13, 2007
Deadline to apply for Nano Education and Outreach (NEO) Program
See events of May 21-25 and November 2007 for full details

April 15-20, 2007
Gordon Conference on Quantum Information Science
Il Ciocco resort, Tuscany, Italy
the complete program and information on the location at the GRC website:
http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?year=2007&program=quantinf

Attendance at this meeting is limited (and it was oversubscribed last year!).
Consequently, we encourage you to apply now by completing the on-line
registration form at
http://www.grc.org/application.aspx
and selecting "Quantum Information Science" from the pulldown menu.

April 16-19, 2007
Third International Conference on Communication and Cooperation (INC3) to be held in Brussels. The overall objective of INC3 is to promote international communication and collaboration in nanotechnology research. Your participation would also provide an opportunity to provide important input to the international effort to map and catalog nanoelectronics research in Europe, Japan, and the U.S.A. The conference program and registration details can be found on the INC3 website at http://www.inc3.be/.

April 19, 2007
Women, Science and Society Seminar Series presents: Dr. Elizabeth Watkins will present a talk titled The Estrogen Elixir: Women and Science in the Making and Unmaking of Hormone Replacement Therapy
6:00 pm. Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, HIM Room, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston. A reception will follow. To learn more about this talk and our other upcoming events, please visit the Faculty Affairs website www.faculty.harvard.edu/events or contact Sylviose Dossous on my staff at sylviose_dossous@harvard.edu or 495-9228.

April 19, 2007
Industrial Partnerships Program: New Concepts in Microfluidics: Theory and Application
Harvard Univeristy, Maxwell Dworkin

April 21, 2007
New Directions in Quantitative Biology
An all-day symposium to be held at Harvard on Saturday, April 21, to which the faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows in your department are cordially invited. The symposium is sponsored by the Division of Life Sciences, with additional support from the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, the FAS Center for Systems Biology, the daVinci Center, and the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center. Nine speakers, representing a truly interdisciplinary mix of exciting research in quantitative biology, will describe their work and be available during lunch and at a post-symposium reception for more informal conversations. An announcement poster is attached; we would be grateful if you could circulate this email and poster within your lab community and your department. The speakers' names and titles are listed below. Abstracts of the talks are available on the MCB web page, http://www.mcb.harvard.edu/NewsEvents/QuantitativeBio/index.html#Abstracts

A breakfast buffet and lunch will be provided, and an informal reception at the end of the symposium day will encourage discussions with the visiting speakers. We ask that you register for the symposium at http://www.mcb.harvard.edu/NewsEvents/QuantitativeBio/Register.asp

April 24, 2007
SRC e-Workshop Graphene
the Graphene e-Workshop, to be presented by Claire Berger, GIT on April 24, 2007, 4:00-5:30p eastern / 3:00-4:30p central / 2:00-3:30p mountain / 1:00-2:30p pacific. This e-Workshop is presented via Microsoft Live Meeting and a phone bridge.
ABSTRACT: Our research project is aimed at developing a new 2 dimensional carbon-based electronic material for low dissipation high-speed nanoelectronics. The idea is based on the exceptional electronic transport properties amply demonstrated in carbon nanotubes nanotube-based transistors such as the non dissipative transport observed up to room temperature. We grow ultrathin graphite epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. The system composed of a few graphene (one atom-thick graphite layer) layers. The interface graphene layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field between grapheme SiC, and the other layers are essentially undoped. We show that unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. the electronic band structure is described by the Dirac-Weyl equation rather than the normal quadratic dispersion relation). This property shared with many 2d graphitic structures is at the origin of ballistic properties of carbon nanotubes. More precisely, we observe an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root magnetic field dependence of Landau level energies. Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long electronic coherence lengths; properties which may persists above cryogenic temperatures. Epitaxial graphene can patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low dissipation high-speed nanoelectronics.
If you have any questions, please let me know. We look forward to your participation.
Lisa Bevins
Nanoelectronics Research Initiative
phone: (919) 941-9433
fax: (919) 941-9450
www.src.org/nri

May 4, 2007
The Harvard Undergraduate Biological Sciences Society (HUBSS) is organizing its
first undergraduate research symposium for students involved with life sciences
research. The event will feature student talks, posters, and refreshments.
Please help us inform the undergraduate students in your lab about this
exciting opportunity. This may be especially rewarding for senior thesis
writers to present their hard work and accomplishments. Students in all areas
of the life sciences are welcome and encouraged to apply, including areas such
as chemical biology, biophysics, bioengineering, computational biology, and
mathematical biology.
3:00, in the Sherman Fairchild building

Abstracts are due by April 19 at 5 pm to Elisa Zhang at etzhang@fas.harvard.edu.
The following information should be included in the submission:

Name
Year
Concentration
Abstract (less than 250 words)
Submission of abstract to be considered for a talk, poster, or both

May 17, 2007
Nanotechnology and Society Workshop: The Organization and Policy of Innovation
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. University of Massachusetts Amherst, Campus Center Room 163C
The workshop is free of charge but registration is required for breakfast and luncheon.
http://www.masspolicy.org/index.php?section=sts&page=schedule

May 20-24, 2007
NSTI Nanotech 2007, celebrating our 10th anniversary, will provide a special focus on the issues of scientific and engineering research developments that are leading to innovative new products, materials and tools that impact industry and understanding.
Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, California
http://www.nsti.org//Nanotech2007/

May 20-25, 2007
Complexity of Biological and Soft Materials
Santa Fe, New Mexico
This conference focuses on the exciting, emerging, interdisciplinary field of biological and soft materials at the interface of physics, biology, and physical chemistry. Topics of particular interest include properties of biopolymers, membranes, and molecular motors, experimental and theoretical studies of single molecules, investigations of natural and artificial cells, and active self-assembly processes. In addition to providing a forum to share and discuss the latest advances in this field, the conference will highlight the achievements, importance, and potential of research collaborations in this area.
http://cnls.lanl.gov/annual27

May 21-25, 2007
Nano Education and Outreach (NEO) Inquiry Workshop
Participants engage in Inquiry-based science learning. Participants will be brought into the NISE Network, learning about the science being done by their peers and connecting with leaders of the NISE museum strands.
Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA
For more information: NEO_flier2007.pdf

May 29, 2007
NRI e-workshop: Graphene: A New 2-Dimensional System for Electronic Applications presented by Philip Kim of Columbia University
Abstract: The massless Dirac particles moving at the speed of light has been a fascinating subject in relativistic quantum physics. Graphene, an isolated single atomic layer of graphite, now provides us an opportunity to investigate such exotic effect in low-energy condensed matter systems. The unique electronic band structure of graphene lattice provides a linear dispersion relation where the Fermi velocity replaces the role of the speed of light in usual Dirac Fermion spectrum. We will discuss the unusual electric transport properties discovered in this novel 2-dimensional system, such as unusual quantum Hall effect and minimum conductivity that manifest quantum mechanical effects even at room temperature. Employing enhanced quantum phenomena in combine with nanofabrication, novel electronic and spintronic device applications based on electric and magnetic field effect discovered in graphene will be discussed.
To register: http://www.src.org/nri/eworkshops.asp?bhcp=1

June 3-6, 2007
Quantum Nanoscience with Spins
Asilomar, CA
The main themes of the meeting will include:
1) Spin transport, and spin momentum transfer
2) New materials: Novel Oxides, Graphene, etc.
3) Quantum spin devices; qubits, etc.
4) The technological perspective
http://pitp.physics.ubc.ca/confs/asilomar/

June 3-8, 2007
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Biological/Biomedical/Chemical Sensing Conference. City University of Hong Kong in Hong Kong. The registration and payment information can be found at lwww.engconfintl.org/7an.html

June 19-20, 2007
5th New England International Nanomanufacturing Workshop
Breaking the Barriers to Nanomanufacturing to Enable the Commercialization of Nanotechnology
Northeastern Univeristy, Boston MA
http://www.nano.neu.edu/events/5th_new_england/

June 24-27, 2007
Seeing at the Nanoscale V, Exploring the Future of Nanotechnology Using SPM and Related Techniques
University of California, Santa Barbara
For more information: www.veeco.com/nanoconference

June 26, 2007
NRI e-workshop: Ballistic Spin Transport and Injection presented by Vincent LaBella of the University at Albany
Abstract: Harnessing the spin as well as the charge of the electron holds great potential to produce novel multifunctional device structures that may help in overcoming the impending roadblocks facing CMOS technology. One of the trusts of the INDEX center is to investigate quantum dot based spintronic devices, which have several advantages over larger scale spin devices such as the spin-FET in part due to their smaller size. Crucial to these and all spintronics devices is spin injection and detection. This talk will discuss these quantum dot based devices and the various contact methods for spin injection and detection. A special focus will be on ballistic or tunnel injection, which holds the greatest potential for spin injection. In addition, results from a spin polarized ballistic electron emission microscopy experiment will be presented that can measure spin dependant scattering in ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts. These contacts have potential to be utilized as spin injectors.
To register: http://www.src.org/nri/eworkshops.asp?bhcp=1

July 2-27, 2007
Boulder School fo Condensed Matter and Material Physics: Biophysics
The 2007 Boulder Summer School aims to give graduate students and postdocs
exposure to some of the most exciting current areas of experimental and
theoretical study in biophysics.

Topics Include:
Signals, noise and information flow in biological networks;
Dynamics on multiple times scales: Adaptation, learning and evolution;
Emergence of macroscopic functions from molecular mechanisms;
Mechanics, from molecules to cells.

The electronic application form (deadline: February 23, 2007) is available
on the School's main web page: http://research.yale.edu/boulder
E-mail can be sent to the organizers at: boulder.organizers@yale.edu

 

July 2-3, 2007
IVC-17/ICSS-13 and ICN+T 2007 Congress in Stockholm, Sweden
The aim of the congress and the exhibition is for professionals within academic research, industry and exhibiting companies to get together take part in recent scientific findings and to share information in the field of materials and nano sciences. We are expecting approximately 2000-3000 delegates to attend the congress.
For more information: www.icnt2007.se

July 2-6, 2007
17th International Vacuum Congress and 13th International Conference on Surface Science
(IVC-17/ICSS-13)
The congress is co-organised with the smaller meetings: 6th Nordic Conference on Surface Science (NCSS-6), 22nd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting (NSM-22), and
4th Swedish Meeting on Vacuum and Materials Science (SVM-4)
Welcome to submit your abstract for the upcoming IVC-17/ICSS-13 and ICN+T 2007 Congress, the large international congress on Nanoscience and Technology, as well as Materials, Surface and Vacuum Science!
Deadline for abstract submission is 5 March, 2007
Deadline for the low registration fee is 25 April, 2007.
The web site has recently been updated with the latest information about invited speakers and scientific committee members.
Please visit the website: www.ivc17.com or www.icnt2007.se for information about the Congress.

July 12-13, 2007
Methods in Bioengineering Confernce focuses on the future of medical technology developed at NIH-funded Resource Centers across the United States. This year Methods in Bioengineering presents distinctive new technologies and the current state-of-the-art in BioMEMS, Regenerative Medicine, Functional Imaging, Opto-Electronics, and Cellular Modeling.
http://cem.sbi.org/MiB/index.html

July 15-20, 2007
EP2DS 17 + 13 MSS
International Conference on Electronic Properties of Two-dimensional Systems and Modulated Semicondusctor Structures
Genova, Magazzini del Cotone
http://www.ep2ds-mss.infm.it/
download conference announcement


July 19-20, 2007
The 5th New England Nanomanufacturing Workshop
Breaking the Barriers to Nanomanufacturing to Enable the Commercialization of Nanotechnology. Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts
http://www.nano.neu.edu/events/5th_new_england/

August 7-10, 2007
1st WUN International Conference on Spintronic Materials and Technology, WUN-SPIN07
York, UK
For more information: www.wun.ac.uk/wun-spin2007

August 13-16, 2007
Third annual mini-summer school in Condensed Matter Physics will be held at Princeton University this August 13-16. The school will cover a range of topics in condensed matter physics. The program is designed to be pedagogical in nature and graduate students and postdocs are especially encouraged to attend. There is no registration fee and lunch will be provided. Interested participants from nearby universities are encouraged to commute in for the lectures. A limited number of campus rooms are available (for a fee) for students not within commuting distance. A list of speakers and topics, as well as information about registration, may be found on the website:http://www.princeton.edu/~pccm/Symposium/summerschool2007.htm

August 17, 2007
Research Experience for Teachers (RET) End of Summer Symposium
RET Participants will be presenting their projects to translate our nanoscale and materials science research to the K-12 classroom
3:00-5:00 pm Harvard University, Maxwell Dworkin 221
For More information: RET07PosterSessionFlyer.pdf

August 27-September 7, 2007
Predoctoral Summer School in Statistical Physics
Houches, France
http://statphys07.inln.cnrs.fr/

August 28, 2007
NRI e-Workshop, Spin-Hall effect in mesoscopic systems:
application of the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism to mesoscopic structures

to be presented by Jairo Sinova, of Texas A&M University on August 28th at 4pm eastern / 3pm central / 2pm mountain / 1pm pacific.
This e-Workshop is presented via Microsoft Live Meeting and a phone bridge.
We have a limited number of simultaneous connections available; therefore, we ask each company to select a site coordinator and reserve a conference room with a projector to accommodate multiple participants. To participate, all you need is a PC with internet connection and a phone line. Multiple sites may participate from each company. To participate in this e-Workshop, please register on-line at http://nri.src.org/member/eworkshops/default.asp


September 11, 2007
Clean Energy Entrepreneurship Two-For-One:
· Tech-In Series #1: US Army Natick Labs
· REBN-East Networking Happy Hour
Bay Colony Corporate Center, 1000 Winter Street, Suite 4000, North Entrance
Waltham, Massachusetts 02451

September 25, 2007
NRI e-Workshop, Pseudospintronics and Graphene : Collective FETS in graphene bilayers?
presented by Allan MacDonald, University of Texas at Austin 2:00pm eastern / 1:00pm central / 12 noon mountain / 11am pacific (PLEASE NOTE TIME IS NOT THE USUAL). This e-Workshop is presented via Microsoft Live Meeting and a phone bridge.
We have a limited number of simultaneous connections available; therefore, we ask each company to select a site coordinator and reserve a conference room with a projector to accommodate multiple participants. To participate, all you need is a PC with internet connection and a phone line. Multiple sites may participate from each company.
To participate in this e-Workshop, please register on-line at http://nri.src.org/member/eworkshops/default.asp

September 26-29, 2007
ICON 2007, 2nd International Conference on One-dimensional Nanostructures
Malmo, Sweden
www.pronano.se/~icon

October 4-5, 2007
2007 Molecular Foundry's Users Meeting, Lawrence Berekely National Laboratory
For more information: http://foundry.lbl.gov/workshops/workshop07/index.html

October 9-10, 2007
NSF Workshop Predictive Modeling of Nanomaterial Properties
Arlington residence Court Hotel, Arlington VA
This workshop will try to identify critical needs, common themes, challenges, and opportunities for predictive modeling of nanomaterials and to define a research program to address these challenges and engage the National Science Foundation, U.S. industry, and the federal laboratories.
For more information: http://www.ncn.purdue.edu/workshops/predictivemodeling

October 9-10, 2007
Nanotechnology Roadmap launch: Poductive Nanosystems Conference
Doubletree Crystal City, Arlington VA
For more information: http://www.foresight.org/nanodot/?p=2478

October 10-11, 2007
CNMS User Meeting. Register now for the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences 2007 User Meeting to be held on October 10-11 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The registration deadline is Monday, September 24. CNMS User Meeting, which is being held as part of ORNL Users Week in conjunction with the user meetings for ORNL's user facilities for neutron scattering and electron microscopy. These meetings will provide an exceptional opportunity for materials researchers to learn how the capabilities of four major scientific user facilities can help advance their research and to provide input on future plans for further developments at these facilities.
For more information: http://www.cnms.ornl.gov/workshops/2007/Agenda-CNMS.pdf

October 14-17, 2007
97th WE-Heraeus Seminar on "Semiconducting Nanowires: Physics, Materials and Devices"
Physikzentrum Bad Honnef, located near Bonn/Germany.
For more information: http://www.zurich.ibm.com/heraeus/2007/

October 14-19, 2007
AVS-54 Internatioanl Symposium and Exhibition
The complete AVS Nanoscience/Nanotechnology program with over 75 invited speakers, 37 technical sessions and 38 commercial exhibitors - for the 54th AVS International Symposium and Exhibition is now available in a special flier. Visit the following link to view the PDF version: http://www2.avs.org/symposium/seattle/NanoFlyer.pdf

October 28-November 2, 2007
ICCS 2007, 7th International Conference on Complex Systems
This conference has two major aims: first, to investigate those
properties or characteristics that appear to be common to the
very different complex systems now under study; and second,
to encourage cross fertilization among the many disciplines
involved.
Boston Marriot Qunicy, Boston, MA
For more information: http://www.necsi.org/events/iccs7/
Proposals for special sessions or symposia may be sent to
symposia@necsi.org.

October 30, 2007
Condensed Matter Theory Seminar
Landau-Zener crossings in quantum-computing systems
Dr. Sahel Ashhab
Frontier Research System, RIKEN
Harvard University, 2:30 pm, Pierce 307

October 30, 2007
NRI e-workshop at 4pm eastern / 3pm central / 2pm mountain / 1pm pacific.
Spin-Torque Devices for High Frequency Electronics to be presented by Hongwen Jiang, of UCLA
This e-Workshop is presented via Microsoft Live Meeting and a phone bridge.
We have a limited number of simultaneous connections available; therefore, we ask each company to select a site coordinator and reserve a conference room with a projector to accommodate multiple participants. To participate, all you need is a PC with internet connection and a phone line. Multiple sites may participate from each company.
To participate in this e-Workshop, please register on-line at http://nri.src.org/member/engine/event/EventDetail.asp?EventID=3044
Site coordinators will be e-mailed with the detailed log-in information a few days prior to e-Workshop. Immediately following the workshop, site coordinators will be asked to provide a rating, feedback/comments on the workshop, and the number of participants from that site via an on-line survey. This survey should take approx. five minutes and greatly assists us in making our e-Workshops better.
Abstract: Spintronics devices made of magnetic multilayers, such as giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and related tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) devices, have been turned into commercial products at record speed. Although the applications of these devices have primarily been in the areas of magnetic field sensors and magnetic memory elements, the recent breakthrough in a new class of devices, termed spin-torque devices (STDs), has demonstrated new functionalities for these all-metal, room-temperature devices. For traditional magnetoresistive devices, the relative orientation of the magnetization of different layers, which determines the device characteristics, is controlled by an Oersted magnetic field. In contrast, the magnetizations in a STD are modulated by a spin-polarized electric current via spin torque transfer. It has been demonstrated experimentally that the device state can be switched by a tiny DC current in the sub-nano-second time scale. Furthermore, the passage of a DC current through a STD can generate steady, phase-coherent microwave signals. In this talk I will review the recent progress in this area and the latest research in STDs within the Western Institute of Nanoelectronics. I will also discuss potential applications of STDs for high-speed, low-dissipation logic and high-frequency signal processing.

November 2, 2007
NSEC/Applied Physics Colloquium
Hari Manoharam, Professor at Stanford University
A Wrinkle in Space: Quantum Isospectral Nanostructures
4:00 pm, Harvard University, 29 Oxford st, Pierce Hall room 209
Abstract: At the juncture of geometry and wave mechanics lurks a subtle yet far-reaching spectral ambiguity.  There exist drum-like manifolds that resonate at identical frequencies but possess different shapes, making it impossible to invert a measured spectrum of excitations into a unique physical reality.  An ongoing mathematical quest has recently compacted this conundrum from higher dimensions to planar geometries.  Inspired by these isospectral domains, we introduce a class of quantum nanostructures characterized by matching electronic structure but divergent physical structure.  We perform quantum measurements (scanning tunneling spectroscopy) on these “quantum drums” (degenerate two-dimensional electrons confined by individually positioned molecules) to reveal that isospectrality provides an extra topological degree of freedom enabling the reconstruction of complete electron wavefunctions—including internal quantum phase information—from measured single-eigenmode probability densities.  These methods are general and extensible to other nanostructures and fabrication techniques.

In these experiments we utilize the exciting technology of atomic and molecular manipulation: a custom-built scanning tunneling microscope, operating at low temperature in ultrahigh vacuum, is used to assemble nanostructures atom-by-atom to generate versatile quantum laboratories at the spatial limit of condensed matter.

 

November 5-8, 2007
4th International Congress of Nanotechnology (ICNT 2007) and the Clean Tech World Congress 2007
Hyatt Regency Hotel, San Francisco, California
For more information: http://www.ianano.org/

November 2007 (4 days)
NISE Network Meeting and NEO Extension
Participants will attend meeting sessions, present posters, and participate in NEO breakout sessions.
For more information: NEO_flier2007.pdf

November 12-13, 2007
3rd Annual Cornell Nanoscale Facility Fall Workshop
Defining the Interface between Nanoscience and Geology
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
http://www.cnf.cornell.edu/cnf_fallworkshop2007.html
** Funding available for graduate or post-doctoral researchers to attend **
Overview:
While nanoscale research and geology at first glance deal with vastly different time and length scales, several areas exist where nanoscale research has profound impact on geologic questions. Density functional approaches provide crucial tools for predicting high pressure crystals beneath the Earth's crust. Fluid transport through porous rock can benefit from tools used in microfluidics. While biomineralization creates macroscale structures like shells and coral, the nanoscale process that proteins use to create large inorganic structures is an active area of research.
Format:
This workshop will highlight issues at the interface between nanoscience and geology. It will also demonstrate nanoscale computational tools that can propel the next generation of geology researchers. The morning sessions will consist of lectures from leaders in the field who will discuss current issues and approaches available. Afternoon sessions will provide hands-on sessions where participants will get to work directly with these codes. In some cases, participants will learn directly from the code's creator.
For more information, please contact Dr. Derek Stewart at stewart@cnf.cornell.edu

November 14, 2007
Mini-Workshop on Nano-Engineering Education in Collaboration with Sandia. Sandia is hosting a one day Mini-Workshop on Nano-Engineering Education. This workshop, led by Dr. Harold Stalford (University of Oklahoma) From 9-12 researchers from several researchers will present their ideas on how to produce and use micro and nano-enabled education-oriented hardware that can be designed and made collaboratively by the universities and Sandia. The ultimate purpose is to provide nano-engineering-enabled hardware and associated learning modules that will help teachers at levels from K-16 to teach science and engineering fundamentals in many areas including solid mechanics, thermo-science, fluids, optics, electronics, electrostatics, etc. If you are interested in attending this workshop please contact Chris Monroe kcmonro@sandia.gov

November 19-22, 2007
4th NTT-BRL School: Recent status in quantum information technology
NTT-BRL School will have several lectures on fundamentals and
recent topics of a research field and show achievements of NTT BRL.
NTT-BRL school is open for PhD and master course students.
Application dedline August 31, 2007.
For more information: http://www.brl.ntt.co.jp/event/brlschool2007/

November 26-December 3, 2007
Weekly Clips from CNS-UCSB
Center for Nanotechnology in Society
For more information: http://www.cns.ucsb.edu/clips/

December 2-7, 2007
2007 International Symposium on Advanced Nanodevices and Nanotechnology
http://www.fulton.asu.edu/~nano/ISANN.htm

December 4, 2007
NRI e-Workshop: Electrically Controllable Antiferromagnets for Spintronics to be presented by Ramamoorthy Ramesh of the University of California at Berkeley
3pm eastern / 2pm central / 1pm mountain / 12 noon pacific.
This e-Workshop is presented via Microsoft Live Meeting and a phone bridge.
We have a limited number of simultaneous connections available; therefore, we ask each company to select a site coordinator and reserve a conference room with a projector to accommodate multiple participants. To participate, all you need is a PC with internet connection and a phone line. Multiple sites may participate from each company.
To participate in this e-Workshop, please register on-line at http://nri.src.org/member/engine/event/EventDetail.asp?EventID=3122
Site coordinators will be e-mailed with the detailed log-in information a few days prior to e-Workshop. Immediately following the workshop, site coordinators will be asked to provide a rating, feedback/comments on the workshop, and the number of participants from that site via an on-line survey. This survey should take approx. five minutes and greatly assists us in making our e-Workshops better.
Abstract: Complex perovskite oxides exhibit a rich spectrum of functional responses, including magnetism, ferroelectricity, highly correlated electron behavior, superconductivity, etc. The basic materials physics of such materials provide the ideal playground for interdisciplinary scientific exploration. Over the past decade we have been exploring the science of such materials (for example, colossal magnetoresistance, ferroelectricity, etc.) in thin film form by creating epitaxial heterostructures and nanostructures. Among the large number of materials systems, there exists a small set of materials which exhibit multiple order parameters; these are known as multiferroics. Using our work in the field of ferroelectric(FE) and ferromagnetic oxides as the background, we are now exploring such materials, as epitaxial thin films as well as nanostructures. Specifically, we are studying the role of thin film growth, heteroepitaxy and processing on the basic properties as well as magnitude of the coupling between the order parameters. In our work we are exploring the switchability of the antiferromagnetic order using this coupling.
What is the importance of this work? Antiferromagnets(AFM) are pervasive in the recording industry. They are used as exchange biasing layers in MTJ's etc. However, to date there has been no antiferomagnet that is electrically tunable. We believe that the multiferroic BiFeO3 is one compound where this can be observed. If this is proven, the next step is to explore the coupling of a ferromagnet to this antiferromagnet through the exchange biasing concept. Ultimately, this will give us the opportunity to switch the magnetic state in a ferromagent( and therefore the spin polarization direction) by simply applying an electric field to the underlying antiferromagnetic ferroelectric. In this talk, I will describe our progress to date on this exciting possibility. We are currently focusing on understanding the coupling between AFM and FE using a combination of scanning force microscopy and photoemission spectromicroscopy.

December 10-13, 2007
Morris Loeb Lectures in Physcis: Don Eigler IBM Almeden Research Center
COLLOQUIUM
4:15 p.m. Harvard University, Jefferson 250
Colloquium: "There’s Plenty of Room in the Middle: A View from the Bottom"
Tea in Jefferson 450 at 3:30 p.m.
In 1959 Richard Feynman gave a remarkably prescient and now-famous talk titled "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" in which he spoke of the possibilities afforded by extreme miniaturization. In that talk he discussed a "great future" in which "we can arrange the atoms the way we want." Feynman's "great future" arrived in 1989 with the discovery of ways to use Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (LT-STMs) to manipulate individual atoms and construct atomically-precise structures. In this first of three Loeb Lectures, I will briefly review the essentials of tunneling microscopy and atom manipulation, highlighting examples of how we use atom manipulation as a means to get at the physics of nanometer-scale structures and to explore novel ways of exploiting quantum mechanics to achieve the goals of classical computation. Time permitting, I will reflect upon the challenges we face in building ever larger structures and the extraordinary opportunities for science and technology that would come from the routine ability to assemble quantum-functional nanometer-scale 3D structures of our own design: the middle.

LECTURE I
3:00 p.m. Harvard University, Jefferson 250
"Computation in Nanometer-Scale Structures: Molecule Cascades"
In this second Loeb Lecture I will discuss a new class of nanometer-scale structures called "molecule cascades," and show how they may be used to implement a general-purpose binary-logic computer in which all of the circuitry is at the nanometer length scale.

LECTURE II
3:00 p.m. Harvard University, Jefferson 250
"Classical Computation in Quantum Nanostructures: A Long Road to an Uncertain Future"
In this third Loeb Lecture I will discuss how we have used the scanning tunneling microscope to measure the spin-excitation spectra of individual atoms. Utilizing spin-excitation spectroscopy as our primary tool, we are now capable of extracting exchange coupling energies, anisotropy energies, and information on the spin configuration of nanometer-scale structures. What we learn from these experiments will hopefully allow us to engineer the “energy landscape” of a system of spins in order to achieve nanometer-scale binary logic circuits that operate using only the spin degree of freedom.

 

December 15, 2007
Educational Programs Holiday Lecture: Squishy, Gooey, Stretchy: The Science of Making Pizza
Join us at the 2007 Harvard Holiday Science Lecture as we observe, touch, taste, and explore some of your favorite foods. Kids, families, students, teachers and the curious are welcome! You'll discover the physics, chemistry and biology of cheese and bread, look at them under a microscope, taste the cheese we make (yum!), and learn about digestion (yuck!). Using live experiments and interactive demonstrations with children from the audience, we will investigate the wonders of pizza. Come and be a scientist with us! This interactive presentation, given by Amy Rowat, Daniel Rosenberg and Howard Stone, is based on a famous set of lectures first given to children a century ago by the great scientist Michael Faraday.
For more information: http://eduprograms.seas.harvard.edu/holidaylec.htm
Free Registration is required http://eduprograms.seas.harvard.edu/register.php

  Last Modified January 20, 2010 by the NSEC Office.